answer all the questions

The first midterm exam is due **** at 11:59 p.m.Once the exam is accessed you will have three hours to complete it.Please review the instructions on the course moodle site for taking the exam before you access the exam.

Review Session:(***) (Hafey Marian 303)

Section I: Lecture Questions

From the list below, taken from course lectures (and listed on your syllabus), I will choose three essays from the list below for your exam.You will select two of the three essay questions to answer.In your answer, you should make sure to define key terms and events that add the necessary detail to your answer and offer an in depth explanation of the who, what, where, when and why of the events in question.Make sure in each case you carefully unpack the meaning of the term modern.Each essay is worth 15% of the total grade for the exam.

1) What is meant by stagnation?How do the 1970s represent both a crisis and a golden age of the good life as outlined in the post-war years?What is a 1970s “good life?”

2) How were the wars in Vietnam and Afghanistan examples of forgetting the virtues of the Cold War logic of proxy wars?How do they demonstrate the retention of the vices of those same proxy wars?How do they demonstrate the limits of the superpowers’ ability to structure the world in their image?

3) How is the Iranian Revolution a commentary on modernity? Westernization? Colonialism?

4) How is 1979 a “hinge year” of the 20th century? How should we make sense of the larger social movements at play?How are they a reaction to stagnation? 1968? Modernity?

5) What accounts for the collapse of socialist regimes in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union?Do the revolutions of 1989 and 1991 represent the triumph of liberal democratic capitalism?

6) What is left of the idea of the good society in 2017?Of the ideological movements of the 20th century that pursued the idea?Where do we go from here?

Section II: Reading Questions

From the list below, taken from course readings (and listed on your syllabus), I will choose three essays from the list below for your exam.You will select two of the three essay questions to answer.In your answer, you should make sure to define key terms and events that add the necessary detail to your answer and offer an in depth explanation of the who, what, where, when and why of the events in question.Make sure in each case you carefully unpack the meaning of the term modern.Each essay is worth 15% of the total grade for the exam.

Reading Questions:

1) How does Hobsbawm understand the “Real Existing Socialism” in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union?What accounts for its successes?Why did it collapse?

2) What were the historical conditions leading to the “crisis decades” (and, ultimately, to “the landslide”)?What were the immediate consequences (see particularly section V in chapter 14)

3) How does the music of Bob Marley help us understand the perils and possibilities of living in the colonial and post-colonial era?How does this correspond to Hobsbawm’s understanding of the period?

4) What does Solzhenitsyn mean by a “world divided?”Where is the division? What are the implications?

5) What does Baldwin mean by the “fire next time?”What are the limitations of the American Liberal Democratic Capitalist vision of the good life?How is it created?What does Baldwin see as its consequences?

6) How does Satrapi understand the good society?Modernity?The Iranian Revolution?The European model?

7) How does Hobsbawm explain the collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union?Its continuation in China?

8) What does Fukuyama mean by the end of history?Are we there? What remains of the modernist project to remake the world?The four major modernist ideologies?Where do we go from here?

9) How does Hobsbawm “approach the millennium?” How does he make sense of the collapse of communism?The transformation of ideology and the good society at the “end of history?”What are we to do?

Section III: Visual Primary Source

In the third section, you will be asked to interpret a visual historical source.How does this source reflect the time and place in which it was produced?What larger themes does it illustrate?How does it connect to themes that we have discussed in class?This section will count for 10% of your exam grade.

Section IV: Hobsbawm

This section will ask you to analyze a short section from the Hobsbawm texts that we are using to contextualize the era of modernity.What claims is Hobsbawm making?What evidence is he using? What are the stakes?This section will count for 10% of your exam grade.

Section V: Cumulative Question

Please answer the following question which will count for 20% of your exam grade.

The narrative of the Twentieth Century presented in this course has been the story of people hoping to discover and establish the good society (defined and frame by ideology).First outline briefly the major ideological contenders of the century, highlighting their world view and attributes, then chose two of the following nations (one from each column) and highlight their own attempts, successes and failures to create the good society:

Column A:Column B:

Soviet UnionIsrael

GermanyIndia

United States Iran

BelgiumCongo / Zaire

 
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